Forum comments in chronological order

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Jag tar inget ansvar för det som skrivs i forumet, förutom mina egna inlägg. Vänligen rapportera alla inlägg som bryter mot reglerna, så ska jag se vad jag kan göra. Som regelbrott räknas till exempel förolämpningar, förtal, spam och olagligt material. Mata inte trålarna.

Feb 2021

The bitbuf

Anonymous
Thu 4-Feb-2021 23:57
This thing is awesome! The technical details section is quite interesting as well.

Nicely done.

SID theme search engine

Anonymous
Fri 5-Feb-2021 05:27
i did not intend to report abuse

A case against syntax highlighting

Anonymous
Thu 18-Feb-2021 19:59
The type of syntax highlighting that is helpful for understanding meaning depends on the complexity of the language. For most programming languages the syntax is highly simplified, so simply denoting different types of tokens is sufficient to help catch the majority of mistakes like unterminated strings.

For English just highlighting token types doesn't help much. You generally already know what type all the tokens are. It's the relationship between them that gets fuzzy due to the much more complex syntax.

Which is why a "syntax-highlighted" English sentence looks like:

Well, I can't inline it. So just go here:

https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2014/08/20/gregor2_custom-c8214189bda85b6ce9baafc8dc9f3143bcda6ae3-s1600-c85.jpg

Safe VSP

Anonymous
Tue 23-Feb-2021 05:24
Hi Linus, you might find interesting this somewhat related paper in which they figure out how to use (modern) DRAM to do massively parallel operations, by exploiting the same "activating multiple rows" behaviour:

https://parallel.princeton.edu/papers/micro19-gao.pdf

There's also this paper from late 2013 (while you released SafeVSP in early 2013 - coincidence or hidden inspiration...?) where they also exploit that behaviour to do in-DRAM copying, but it's only theoretical as they didn't actually attempt it with real parts and only mention to the effect that it's "not allowed", unlike the above paper which actually tried it and discovered it already works:

https://users.ece.cmu.edu/~omutlu/pub/rowclone_micro13.pdf

I bet this effect is reproducible with all DRAM ever made, from the ones used in the C64 to the latest DDRs.